Friends and Family and Alaskan Beer

My dad was an early settler in the Chugiak area. He still lives in the house he built in the 60’s. When we were out to breakfast everyone who walked in called out a greeting…kind of like on “Cheers.” It was nice to have a chance to catch up with him and his wife Debbie. Too much time goes between visits.

Here's the gang.

Here’s the gang.

This is us to the right along with three of my brothers and two of my sisters and some of their kids and some of their kids.

This is us to the right along with three of my brothers and two of my sisters and some of their kids and some of their kids.

We have a lot of family in the Anchorage area, so my sister Cindy offered to organize a family get together. Brother Kelly and his wife offered to serve as hosts. The warm summer sun kept the mosquitoes at bay and we were able to meet and greet and visit everyone out on their lush green lawn in the back yard. It was great fun to meet all the extended family.

Brother Tom's one of a kind Moose Truck. Now THIS is Alaska.

Brother Tom’s one of a kind Moose Truck. Now THIS is Alaska.

Of course, we are ones who do eat and run… Oh, if we only had more hours in a day. After saying our good byes we headed south to Kenai where we spent the night with our longtime friend Dean and his amazing wife Saki.

Their home is right on the edge of a cliff overlooking the bay; they truly have a million-dollar view. We got to see Saki’s mini farm where she raises all kinds of poultry, including ones for dinner. The kids were especially impressed that we got to see a baby chicken hatch out of its shell! What an experience.

Look closely. This is the eyeball of a baby chick working to peck his way out of the shell.

Look closely. This is the eyeball of a baby chick working to peck his way out of the shell.

The drive to Kenai is absolutely beautiful. It begins heading south of Anchorage following Turnagain Arm where we could see the mudflats as the tide was out. Even as a young child it was drilled into me how dangerous the mudflats were; the mud acts as quicksand, making it difficult to move quickly, and the long shallow flats mean that the tide can race in, catching an unaware person.

Turnagain Arm in Cook Inlet

Turnagain Arm in Cook Inlet

Further south we drove over the pass and then followed the Russian and Kenai Rivers. I hope my pictures can adequately show the aquamarine color of these rivers. Amazing.

I've forgotten, this is either the Kenai or Russian River. Look at the beautiful color. They catch big salmon in this river.

I’ve forgotten, this is either the Kenai or Russian River. Look at the beautiful color. They catch big salmon in this river.

Here’s an observation: Every house we have visited in Alaska has a twelve pack of cold Alaska beer in the fridge. It makes me wonder if I shouldn’t be stocking some kind of Arizona beer?

Next: All the way to Homer and then to a glacier.

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